Rhode Island State Bird
Rhode Island Red Hen

Official Rhode Island State Bird Name: Rhode Island Red Hen Rhode Island Red Hen

Origin: Developed in the New England states of Massachusetts and Rhode Island, early flocks often had both single and rose combed individuals because of the influence of Malay blood. It was from the Malay that the Rhode Island Red got its deep color, strong constitution and relatively hard feathers.

Use: A dual purpose medium heavy fowl; used more for egg production than meat production because of its dark colored pin feathers and its ability to lay brown eggs at a high rate.

They can be very tame around people, but can be aggresive to other chickens in the flock.


The Rhode Island Red Hen became the Rhode Island State bird on May 3, 1954 (Rhode Island State Affairs and Government 42-4-5 State bird: The breed of fowl, commonly known as the "Rhode Island red," is designated, and shall be known, as the official state bird.).

Rhode Island, Delaware and South Dakota are the only three U.S. States that have selected non-native birds as the Official State Bird.

Go to Delaware State Bird (Blue Hen).

Go to South Dakota State Bird (Ring-necked Pheasant).

Rhode Island Red Hens Video

Video shows how Rhode Island Red Hens grow from chicks into adults.

Rhode Island Birds

Rhode Island Red Hens

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